Workshops


Carol Cadby offers the following workshops.  Level of instruction and duration of workshop (2 hrs - 2 wks) is flexible. For more information and bookings contact
carolcadby@aol.com


Acting

·         Scene Study and Analysis

Analyze and identify the circumstances of the staged reality which determine a character’s objectives, tactics, relationship, status, activity, sense of urgency and behavior in a scene.

 

·         Meisner Repetition Exercises for the Actor

Use Sandford Meisner’s Repetition exercises to strip actors of affected behavior and redirect focus on a partner’s intensions and actions

 

·         Objectives, Tactics and Making Active Choices

Interpret human behavior as a series of tactics to achieve an objective.  Apply this analysis to scene work with an emphasis on problem solving and making strong acting choices.

 

·         The Importance of Ensemble 

Introduce theatre games and trust exercises to reinforce the value of team work, communication and collaboration in theatre training

 

·         Hagen Basic Object Exercises for the Actor

Use Uta Hagen’s Basic Object exercises to teach acting concept such as privacy in public, living truthfully, location, sense of place, activities, obstacles, sense of urgency, circumstances, fourth wall, endowments, personalization, specificity, substitution, self-identity and sensory awareness 

 

·         Movement for the Actor

Use music generated improvisations and exercises to teach movement concepts such as tempo, direction, topography, shape, weight, negative space, levels, freezes, flexibility, focus and physical contact (presented at the 2006 Signature Theatre Exchange)

 

·         Using Character Studies in Characterization

Outline an approach for characterization involving the observation of people from daily life.  Guided group improvisations based on the study of the internal and external aspects of a young child, a middle aged person and an elderly person illustrate the affect age, physicality, personality, background, intelligence and point of view have on a character’s behavior.      

 

·         Auditioning

Use Michael Shurleff’s Twelve Guideposts to Auditioning to enhance the delivery of monologues

 

·         Using Laban Efforts in Characterization and Movement

Illustrate the application of the eight Laban Efforts to acting and characterization by teaching the concepts of direction, tempo, weight and flow (presented at the 2007 Signature Theatre Exchange)

 

·         Viewpoints for the Actor: an Approach to Improvisation & Staging

Use Viewpoints movement exercises to teach kinesthetic response, spontaneity, partner/ensemble awareness and composition.  Apply the concepts of spatial relationship, tempo, topography, shape, repetition, gesture and architecture.  (presented at the 2009 Arlington Public Schools Theatre Arts Teachers in-service)

 


Directing

·         Understanding Staging and Theatricality

Apply theatrical choices to personal stories and illustrate the incorporation of a statement, sequential story line, climax, level of abstraction, stage patterns, sense of urgency, place/location, varied movement, vocal quality, transitions, characterization, tempo and emotional commitment.        

 

·         Elements of Directing

Use Terry John Converse’s Silent Seven exercises to teach directing concepts such as visual pauses, body positions, role of music, levels, psychological areas, stage positions, direction of movement, justified movement, blocking, stage patterns and visual progression.

 

·         Stage Combat and Music: The Theatrical Potential of Music and Stylized Movement

Illustrate the story telling potential of stylized movement and music by weaving a slow motion stage fight into an improvised scene. (presented at the 2008 Virginia Theatre Association Conference)

 

·         Viewpoints: an Approach to Improvisation & Staging

Use Viewpoints movement exercises to teach kinesthetic response, spontaneity, partner/ensemble awareness and composition.  Apply the concepts of spatial relationship, tempo, topography, shape, repetition, gesture and architecture. 

 


Theatre Education

·         Methods of Teaching  Theatre Arts on the Secondary Level

Outline approaches and best practices in Theatre Education at the high school level.  Discuss lesson planning, classroom management, grading and evaluation, adolescent self-development, producing/directing shows and parental involvement.  

 

·         Acting Through Self Development

Outline a curriculum/approach which addresses adolescent developmental issues in actor training.  Through theatre games and self-discovery exercises students learn acting techniques as well as address personal, social and developmental issues.  (presented at the 2007 South Eastern Theatre Conference and the 2006 American Association of Theatre Educators)

 

·         Methods of teaching Auditioning (CAU 2008)

Describe a mock audition format used to teach secondary students presentation skills, monologue techniques and cold reading strategies. Through the experience of being the actor as well as the casting director, students also learn the value of self-confidence, authentic communication, stereotyping, decision making and preparation.  (presented at Catholic University’s Master in Theatre Education Program, 2009)

 

·         Writing a One Person Original Pieces

Explain a sequential three-year Theatre Arts curriculum where students write, stage and present a series of original pieces. Through these pieces students gain an understanding of their personal interests, the importance of communication and elements of theatricality.  The development and presentation of the pieces is staggered over several years during which time students are taught units on characterization, monologues, scene study, directing/staging, acting, self development and playwrighting.  (presented at Catholic University’s Master’s in Theatre Education Program, 2008)

 

·         Methods of Teaching Theatre Improvisation

Teach theatre games and trust exercises to reinforce the value of team work, communication and collaboration in theatre training (presented at the 2009 Arlington Public Schools Theatre Arts Teachers In-service)

 

·         Directing and Producing a High School Play

Describe approaches to directing and producing plays or musicals on the high school level.  Special emphasis given to the educational value of the process, play selection, casting, rehearsing, scheduling, staging, technical aspects, fundraising, publicity, community outreach and parental involvement.